Dating bottle glass


28-Mar-2017 16:36

THOUSANDS of bottles carry only a number on the base (or heel), and this information (in most cases) does not help ID the source or age………….nearly all glass factories used mold numbers on their containers at one time or another. Guetig, Conrad Selle, Tod Von Mechow, Don Dzuro, Johnnie W. Paquette, Bill Lindsey, Carol Serr, Mark Newton, and Lee Brewer, as well as many others.

However, the general style, shape and glass color of a container can give strong clues to approximate age. That book is the best reference work ever published on glass manufacturers’ marks on bottles, but it does contain many errors which have been discovered over the last several decades since it’s publication. Fletcher, Norman “Ted” Oppelt, Dick Cole, Harvey Teal, Dean Six, Tom Neff, Albert Morin, John P. (Eventually, I may add a page on this site with lists of books by some of the above-named persons which I found to be of most value.

for assigning date ranges) especially on marks of pre-1900 bottles. In the great majority of cases, bottles with only numbers on the base are difficult, if not impossible, to attribute to a specific glass maker.

For the most part, I have not attempted to list fine distinctions for marks that are found both with and without periods. See my webpage here with more info on numbers seen on bottles.

dating bottle glass-23

Tube granny hookup dating

The best way to distinguish old glass fragments from the modern ones is to look at the sun through the glass.I hope this list will be of assistance to those interested in antique bottles and other glass containers made in the United States and the history behind the factories that manufactured them. (I believe Because of this I am going to have to stop answering all but questions of the very widest interest to the collecting public.I am striving to add more articles on this site relating to glass and glass collecting, both of a general nature, and addressing certain collecting “niches”, as time and energy permits! If it’s a question that is already answered somewhere on this site, then a *keyword search* will have to suffice (look along the top right-hand area of any page for the search box), and I may not reply with an individual answer.The 19th century porcelain shards can be distinguished from the older shards by the absence of crazing on glaze and availability of the manufacturer's coat of arms stamped on plateware.

The characteristics that distinguish the 19th century shards from the 20th century ones were mentioned on page 53.

Many marks are encountered that indicate the company whose product was contained within it, or are trademarks (“brand names”) that give no indication of who actually made the glass, and those are (with quite a few exceptions) , not included in my list.



Footwork & Observation Approximate Dating of China Shards & Bottle Glass Pieces… continue reading »


Read more